Alaska Fishing: Whittier Saltwater Fishing

Located just a short 40-minute drive south of Anchorage, Whittier offers the closest saltwater fishing opportunities to Anchorage. As a result, this is a very popular fishery for both shore-based and boat-based fishermen. Whittier also offers a good selection of charter outfits that can get you into the thick of the action. Boat rentals are available for those who prefer to hit the salt without the hassles of ownership.


Silver salmon fishing in Whittier, Alaska

Private boaters love the many hidden coves and bays available out of Whittier, which provide excellent access to the remote waters of Prince William Sound. The harbor offers 350 permanent and transient slips, so it is possible to leave your boat moored down there all summer, adding greatly to the convenience of getting on the water and out to productive fishing grounds quickly.

Alaska Salmon Run Charts

Because Whittier sits at the end of a long fjord that feeds out to Prince William Sound, the area is notorious for windy, inclement weather. Pick your day carefully and you'll have an experience second to none. Choose poorly and you face rough seas and dangerously high winds.

In most cases you will have to run two hours or more on the water in order to arrive at some of the better areas. Halibut are available out of Whittier, however, they are not widely-distributed, and prime halibut fishing areas are among the most closely-guarded secrets in the area. Rockfish, including yelloweye, are found in abundance if you know where to look, and salmon fishing is outstanding at times. Lingcod can be found in the outer reaches beyond Culross Passage, and salmon sharks can be taken in the area as well.

 


=WARNING! BARRY ARM TSUNAMI WARNING=

In May 2020 scientists warned of a potentially massive tsunami generated by a landslide in Barry Arm. READ MORE.


Safety First!

Alaska's marine environment provides an excellent playground for outdoors enthusiasts, whether you're cruising, kayaking, sailing or powerboating. But it can get ugly in a hurry, with strong currents, ferocious weather, and bone-chilling icy waters. This is no place to make mistakes! ALWAYS check the weather before leaving port, and make sure your boat is in sound mechanical condition. The Alaska Office of Boating Safety posts the following checklist for boaters in Alaska's waters:

  • Life jackets worn by each person (proper size & fit, & fastened)
  • Communication & signaling devices carried ON person
  • Throwable Type IV flotation device attached to floating line
  • Fire extinguisher(s) fully charged & mounted securely
  • Ability to make an efficient sound signal (horn or whistle)
  • USCG-approved visual distress signals (check expiration dates)
  • Boat registration current, properly displayed & certificate on board
  • Drain plugs installed, thru hull fittings leak-free, sea cocks closed
  • Hoses/clamps, drive units/props, fuel lines/filters, blowers/backfire flame arrestors (inboards) inspected
  • Scuppers clear, bilge clean
  • Battery fully charged, secured, terminals covered
  • Back-up manual bailing device(s) accessible & functional
  • Back-up propulsion source (spare engine, sail, paddles or oars)
  • Tools/parts; spare batteries, fuses, spark plugs, belts, prop & prop nut
  • Anchors (2),each with chain & line, one attached to boat
  • Food, water, spare clothing and shelter (tent/tarp) in waterproof bag
  • Reboarding devices (footsling, swimstep, ladder)
  • First aid kit
  • Navigation tools; GPS, compass, charts, maps, tidebook
  • Fuel & oil sufficient for trip—1/3out, 1/3return, 1/3spare
  • Test engines, emergency cut-off cable, steering, gear shift & lights
  • Emergency Locator Beacons, radios & other electronics functioning
  • Weather, forecast update and observations
  • Passengers/load distributed properly, items secured from shifting
  • Float plan prepared and transmitted to responsible party
  • Passenger briefing—how to start/stop & steer boat, clothing check, location of & how to use communications & emergency equipment

You can download and print this document AT THIS LINK.

CAUTION: Use extreme caution when navigating Prince William Sound. Many areas have floating ice, deadheads (partially-submerged logs), and uncharted rocks. Proceed with extreme caution, and always keep a sharp eye out for floating debris. Steer well clear of shoreline areas when operating on step, and when navigating near shore or in bays, post a lookout on the bow to scan for uncharted rocks just below the surface. There have been numerous reports of prop damage, lower unit shears, and hull damage from submerged rocks that do not appear on nautical charts.


FILE A FLOAT PLAN!

Every year people go missing in Alaska, because they failed to tell someone where they were going. Take a few minutes before your trip to file a float plan! In this way, qualified rescuers can conduct a search in the area where you are supposed to be, along with the route you intended to take to get there and back. A float plan could save your life! CLICK HERE to file an online float plan with the Alaska Department of Natural Resources.


What is the Best Way to Fish Whittier Saltwater?

Whittier offers several unique ways to experience the saltwater fishery; here are some ideas:

Option 1: Day Trips

There are a number of day trips available out of Whittier. If you own your own boat, you might try trolling around the head of the bay for silvers. There's a good run that comes in during August, and continues into late fall, with the month of October being generally good. Kings and chums are available during mid summer. You might also try jigging for herring with a sabiki rig; fairly large numbers of herring are available clear at the head of the bay and are worth the effort, whether you intend to use them as bait or for canning or smoking.

There are several charter outfits available from the Whittier harbor, and they offer salmon and rockfish trips on a daily basis. Halibut fishing in the immediate vicinity of Whittier can be spotty due to the steep underwater topography, however, charter captains can take longer runs to get you on the fish.

Option 2: Overnight OnboardCruising Guide to Prince William Sound

There are many hidden coves and sheltered bays that offer safe overnight anchorages, and can put you within striking distance of some outstanding shrimping and saltwater fishing opportunities. Pick up a copy of the Cruising Guide to Prince William Sound for details on these and many other points of interest throughout Prince William Sound.

Some charters offer overnight trips, however most of these are traveling to very remote locations outside the bay.

Option 3: Beach Camping

Several of the coves out of Whittier offer shore-based camping, and this can be a great way to spend a summer evening. Gather up some driftwood and cook your catch out in the open air while you relax in a beach chair and soak up the long, cool evening light. Then stroll off to your tent and fall asleep to the gentle sighing of the wavelets lapping the beach. It's an unparalleled experience.

Option 4: Cabin Camping

Many cabins are available out of Whittier, at various distances from Whittier harbor. These can offer a great place to hole up if the weather goes down, but they're excellent places to stay in their own right. You'll need to bring your own cookware and such, but many folks enjoy the security and warmth of a remote cabin for at least part of their extended stay on the fringes of Prince William Sound. Check out our Recreational Cabins listings for details.

Public cabins are listed below, near their respective fishing locations. A brief description is provided, along with reservation instructions and GPS coordinates. Cabins are reserved well in advance of the season, so plan ahead.

Cabin Packing List

Most recreational cabins come equipped with built-in bunks without mattresses or bedding. There is generally a stove; in some cases it's a wood stove, in other cases it's an oil stove, and sometimes there is both. Cabins almost always have a table and benches. There is usually an outhouse, and some cabins are handicap-accessible. Cabins do not come fully-equipped, however, and you will need to bring your own things. Here is a list of basics you must bring with you for your cabin stay:

  • Bedding. Sleeping bags, pillows, and pads for everyone staying in the cabin.
  • Cots. Not required for most cabins, but if the cabin only has four bunks and you have six people, bring a couple of folding cots. The Roll-a-Cot® is ideal for this, because it is very strong and packable.
  • Cookware. You will need pots and pans for cooking, along with a coffee pot, utensils, bowls, plates, and cups.
  • Cookstove. Bring a stove and fuel for it.
  • Lantern. Cabins are off-grid and there are no lights. Bring a lantern and a headlamp. Bring spare fuel for the lantern.
  • Food. Bring your own grocery items. Cold foods can be kept in a cooler, but the cooler should be left inside the cabin at all times, prevent bear problems. Do not leave food in the cabins; it attracts rodents.
  • Drinking water. Some cabins have a stream nearby, where you can obtain water. In those cases, bring a water jug and a filter. Always filter your water anywhere in Alaska. If there is no freshwater supply, you have to bring your own drinking water.
  • Stove fuel. If the cabin comes with an oil stove, bring kerosene. Plan on burning a gallon a day.
  • Axe / saw. If the cabin comes with a woodstove, you need the tools to collect firewood and split it for the stove. Note that with popular cabins, firewood may be in scarce supply. In those cases, bring your firewood with you.
  • Toilet paper. Cabins do not always have toilet paper. Bring your own.
  • Trash bags. Haul out all your trash. You may burn paper trash in the woodstove.
  • Small broom and dustpan. It is your responsibility to clean the cabin before you leave.

Prince William Sound Hatcheries

A number of salmon hatcheries and release facilities exist throughout Prince William Sound, and all but one of them are operated by the Prince William Sound Aquaculture Corporation. The remaining hatchery, the Solomon Gulch Hatchery, is operated by Valdez Fisheries Development Association. Both organizations are nonprofits. These hatcheries exist to augment wild fish production for sport and commercial use. Here is a list of the hatcheries in Prince William Sound; their locations are plotted on the map on this page.

A. Solomon Gulch Hatchery. Species: Pink salmon, silver salmon.

B. Port Chalmers Salmon Pens. Species: Chum salmon. Fry are hatched at Armin F. Koernig Hatchery, transported to Port Chalmers and acclimated to saltwater here, and released from this site.

C. Armin F. Koernig Hatchery. Species: Pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, king salmon. The chum salmon fry released at Port Chalmers are hatched here. The hatchery is located near the town of Chenega in Sawmill Bay on Evans Island.

D. Main Bay Hatchery. Species: Sockeye salmon.

E. Wally Noerenberg Hatchery. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon.

F. Cannery Creek Hatchery. Species: Pink salmon.

Available Fisheries

Whittier offers a variety of fishing opportunities to both shore-based and boat-based fishermen. Shore fishing is much more limited due to access issues, but what's there can be very good at times. Let's take a look:

Shore-Based Fishing

Shorebound anglers will find plenty of opportunities in the immediate vicinity of Whittier, provided they are in sync with the run timing. Silvers and king salmon may be caught at the head of Passage Canal, along the shoreline area. The most popular method is snagging, which is legal in saltwater, but note that snagging is prohibited in Whittier Harbor. Kings and silvers will also take spoons and spinners, as well as herring or salmon roe fished under a bobber. NOTE: A project is currently underway to extend the road from Whittier out to the Trinity Point area at Shotgun Cove. This will add significantly to the Whittier roadside fishing opportunity.

1. Whittier Harbor. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, pacific cod.
Amenities: wheelchair icon rv icon shower icon restrooms icon water icon camping icon picnic table icon hiking icon boat ramp icon

2. Head of Passage Canal. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut. This is also a popular spot for casting for herring. Bring along a few sabiki rigs for that. Distance from Whittier harbor: .90 miles.

3. Smitty's Cove. King salmon, silver salmon. Distance from Whittier Harbor: .82 miles by road.

Boat-Based Fishing

A number of charter outfits operate out of Whittier, and they typically run 2-2.5 hours to get to the better fishing areas. The big draw in Whittier is salmon; particularly king and silver salmon. Sockeye are locally popular, especially for those running out to the Coghill River, where one of the largest sockeye runs in Prince William Sound goes to spawn. Shrimping is popular, as is halibut, lingcod, and rockfish fishing.

Passage Canal Area

4. Shotgun Cove. Species: Chum salmon, coho salmon, pink salmon. Troll the mouth of the cove for silvers. Spotty for halibut. There’s an old wreck along the east side of Neptune Cove. It’s the old ferry Leschi, which was being used as a processor until it went adrift from its mooring anchor and washed ashore. Distance from Whittier: 5.7 miles.
Amenities: None

5. Passage Canal. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, herring, pacific cod, rockfish, sablefish (black cod), shrimp. Rockfish opportunities are best along the steep drop opposite the harbor, out near Poe Bay, and on the south side near Emerald Bay and Trinity Point. Focus on areas with a rocky or gravelly bottom, instead of mud and silt for the best results. Large schools of herring come into Passage Canal starting as early as mid-May. Distance from Whittier:.
6. Decision Point. Species: Chum, pink, silver and king salmon, rockfish, lingcod. Chum and pink salmon are found in Squirrel Creek, and king and silver salmon are available in this area. Troll along the north side where the bottom drops off into deep water. Distance from Whittier: 8.4 miles
Amenities: None

6. Decision Point. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish. This area can be very good during the silver run. Try trolling parallel to the shoreline. Halibut fishing is better toward the Tonsina Creek side. There's a pinnacle about halfway across the bay from Derby Cove, that rises from depths of over 900 feet, and it offers good fishing for rockfish and greenling. The top of the pinnacle is roughly 80 feet down, with a somewhat gradual slope both north and south. Distance from Whittier: 18 miles. 
Amenities: None

Squirrel Cove Cabin: This cabin is located on the south side of Passage Canal about eight miles from Whittier. The cabin is 16'x16', and sleeps eight on two full-sized bunks, with room on the floor (bring your own bedding and extra cots). Includes table, benches, countertops, and a fire ring outside (bring your own firewood). There is an oil stove in the cabin; bring kerosene or #1 diesel for fuel. There is no fresh water nearby; bring your own water.  Advance reservations recommended AT THIS LINK. GPS: N60°48'21.52" W148°28'43.01" / Lat. 60.36444 Long. 148.4786

A Word of Wisdom on Yelloweye: Yelloweye rockfish are readily available throughout Prince William Sound, especially on long-range trips. Remember that these fish are very long-lived; it takes females around 35 years to reach reproductive maturity, and the reproduction rate is relatively low, compared to other rockfish species. Yelloweye tend to live on the same rockpile for their entire life, making them very susceptible to over harvest. Do the next generation a favor by limiting your yelloweye harvest. Some areas in Alaska have already been depleted, and it's up to us to preserve this fishery! Yelloweye live in deep water, and bringing one to the surface always results in overexpansion of the float bladder. How do you release them? Read our page on Rockfish Recompression.

South of Passage Canal, Culross Island

7. Blackstone Bay. Species: Chum, pink, silver and king salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. Look for rockfish and lings between Decision Point and Strong Point, wrapping around into Blackstone Bay. This is also a good area to troll for salmon. There are a significant number of glaciers bordering Blackstone, and the melt from these glaciers ads significantly to the freshwater content of the bay. Your best results are going to be on an incoming tide, where halibut and rockfish are concerned. Distance from Whittier: 10 miles.

8. Cochrane Bay. King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. There are four tent platforms, a pit latrine, and bearproof food lockers located in Surprise Cove State Marine Park, on the northwest side of Cochrane Bay. This could be an option if your boat is not suitable for camping aboard. Distance from Whittier: 14 miles.

Paulson Bay Cabin: The cabin is located on a bluff on the west side of the head of Cochrane Bay, and is accessed via steps up from the beach. It offers a great view of Port Wells and College Fjord. Access via boat must account for tides, as there are shallow rock ledges on the way in. The cabin is 12x14 and has wood bunks, a table and benches, a kerosene stove and a composting toilet. Bring your own kerosene, and plan on a gallon a day or so. Bring your own drinking water, cookstove, cookware, bedding, and lantern. Bring a small broom to clean out the cabin before you leave. Pack out your trash. Advance reservations recommended AT THIS LINK. GPS: N60°41'34" W148°23'54" / Lat. 60.69278 Long. 148.3983

9. Culross Bay. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. Culross Bay is an ideal anchorage because it’s protected from winds and swells out of the west. The shorelines are fairly flat and there is a tide flat at the head of the bay. Be cautious of shallow water in this area. NOTE: Lingcod and rockfish can be found around Applegate Island, just south of Culross Island. Distance from Whittier: 24 miles.

Goose Bay Cabin: This cabin is located near a small waterfall on the east side of the bay. The area in front of the cabin is shallow at low tide and may present a challenge. Best access is at high tide. The cabin is 12x14 and comes equipped with wood bunks, a table and benches, a propane stove for heat and a pit toilet. Bring your own drinking water, propane (uses standard hookup for a gas grill), cookstove, lantern, cookware and bedding. Bring a small broom to clean out the cabin before you leave. Pack out your trash. Advance reservations recommended AT THIS LINK. GPS: N60°42'54" W148°13'26.4" / Lat. 60.715 Long. 148.224 NOTE: This cabin sustained damage to snow load and is currently closed. Check back for future availability.

10. Hidden Bay. Species: Pink salmon, rockfish, lingcod, halibut. Hidden Bay is a sheltered bay that offers an ideal anchorage in rough weather. Several streams enter the bay and are home to migrating pink salmon. This area is of interest to commercial seiners, however, so be careful and stay clear during active fishing operations. At low tide mussels are available in some areas. Distance from Whittier: 24 miles.

11. Culross Passage. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, rockfish, lingcod. Culross is not normally considered a fishing location, but a passage to locations farther south. It’s a very narrow, rocky, and shallow passage that requires extra attention at the helm and with your chart plotter to avoid hitting shallow rocks. We have a good forum thread on navigating Culross Passage AT THIS LINK. Check it before you go! Distance from Whittier: 17.2 miles.

12. Long Bay. Species: Chum salmon, coho salmon, pink salmon, sockeye salmon, Dolly Varden, halibut. The outflow creek from Schrode Lake hosts a run of sockeye salmon from early June through mid-July, and the creek also has Dolly Varden. The head end of the bay offers a good, protected anchorage. Distance from Whittier: 21.8 miles.

13. Lake Schrode. Species: Sockeye in mid-July, pink salmon from mid-July through mid-August, and silver salmon in late August, Dolly Varden year-round. Fish the outlet stream and nearby lagoon for salmon, and the stream and lake for Dollies. Distance from Whittier: 25 miles.

Schrode Lake Cabin: This cabin is located at the northeast corner of Shrode Lake. Access is via Long Bay. Anchor in the bay and hike about a mile to the cabin. The cabin is a 16'x16' A-frame with a loft, sleeps six on provided bunks. Bedding is not provided, so guests should bring bedding. Amenities include bunk beds, kerosene heater (bring fuel), a table, benches, broom, fire extinguisher. There's an outhouse with a pit toilet. A small rowboat is provided, with oars. Guests must provide their own PFDs. Fresh water is available from nearby sources but must be treated before use. Bring the following items for your stay: Sleeping bags and pads, kerosene for the heater (1 gallon / four hours), cookstove and fuel, cookware and utensils, plates, bowls, dishpan, dish soap, water jug and filter system, lantern, toilet paper, trash bags. Advance reservations recommended AT THIS LINK. GPS: N60°39'29" W148°18'34" / Lat. 60.65805556 Long. 148.3094444

14. Lake Jack. Species: Dolly Varden. Jack Lake lies to the east and south of Schrode Lake. Access it by walking up the creek from Schrode Lake, past the falls. Distance from Whittier: 25.8 miles.

Port Nellie Juan and South

15. Port Nellie Juan. Port Nellie Juan. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, black cod, shrimp. The south side of Port Nellie Juan from Coxcomb Point to Blue Fjord contains a good mix of glacial silt and fresh water, making it slightly less productive for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod than the north side from East Finger Inlet to the Mink Island area. This is also a good area to troll for salmon, provided the conditions are not too rough. This portion of Port Nellie Juan gets strong winds and a stiff chop when the wind is out of the east. There’s often a day breeze that comes up off of the Sargent Icefield and its associated glaciers to the south. This doesn’t usually happen until around mid-morning, so you could spend the early part of the day fishing this area before ducking into any of several sheltered coves, or even McClure Bay for an attempt at rockfish or halibut. Distance from Whittier: 30.8 miles.

16. Kings Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. Located at the head of Kings Bay, the Nellie Juan River and the Kings River both host runs of chums, pinks, coho, and sockeye salmon. Later in the season as the salmon start to die off, you might find halibut in the waters off these river mouths. The river flowing in the east of Kings Point has runs of pinks and coho salmon; try casting from shore, fishing the river itself, or trolling from Kings Point east. Other streams flowing into Kings Bay offer similar opportunities. Distance from Whittier: 45 miles.

17. Deep Water Bay. Species: Pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. The northernmost stream draining into Deep Water Bay offers opportunities for pinks, silvers, and reds. Sockeye are usually lake spawners, and in this case they are using the lake located about a half-mile upriver from the bay for spawning. Look for halibut off the creek mouth. Try drifting on an outgoing tide with bait or jigs. Deepwater Bay offers a good anchorage in rough weather. Distance from Whittier: 41.8 miles.

18. Derickson Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. Chum and pink salmon use the roundish lake west of the bay for spawning. Try casting from shore or trolling off the river mouth. There’s a creek on the east side of the glacial moraine at the head of the bay which is used by pink salmon, and there’s another that drains a lake east of the bay. This second creek has both pinks and silvers and provides excellent shelter from the wind off of the icefield to the south. Watch for ice chunks from Nellie Juan Glacier to the south; sometimes the bay is loaded with them. Also, the bay may get quite choppy once the wind cranks up from Nellie Juan Glacier and the Sargent Icefield. Distance from Whittier: 41.5 miles.

19. Blue Fiord. Species: Chum salmon, coho salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp.  Due to the heavy load of suspended silt in the water column, the best fishing opportunities in this area are at the entrance of the bay. The bottom here changes from mostly mud and glacial silt to a mixture of silt and sand. This is more favorable for halibut. Look for rockfish along the headlands on either side of the entrance to the bay. Shrimping can be good in the fjord itself.  Distance from Whittier: 40.6 miles.

20. McClure Bay. Species: Chum salmon, coho salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. There are a number of salmon spawning streams at the head of McClure Bay that are used by both chum and pink salmon. For halibut, try your luck on a falling tide in this area. An even better place is west of the point on the west side of the entrance, where the bottom contour drops quickly into Port Nellie Juan. Fish the entire curve of this point for rockfish and lingcod. Distance from Whittier: 34.8 miles.

21. Main Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, rockfish. Halibut fishing is spotty. Trolling for silvers is best around July 4th, and there is a sockeye salmon hatchery at the head of the bay. Fish return to the hatchery in the last half of June through the first half of July. This hatchery rears sockeye salmon that are destined to be stocked at Coghill Lake, on the west side of College Fjord. Steer clear of setnet buoys near the shoreline in many areas here. Distance from Whittier: 34.7 miles.

22. Eshamy Bay. Species: Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, halibut, lingcod, rockfish. Eshamy Bay offers a variety of freshwater and saltwater fishing opportunities in a relatively sheltered bay that provides a good anchorage. One of the big draws here is sockeye salmon. Eshamy has the second largest sockeye run in all of Prince William Sound, with about 20,000 fish crossing the weir on Eshamy Creek into Eshamy Lake every year. Sockeye fishing takes place in the lagoon at the creek mouth and below the weir, which is located .1 mile upriver from the river mouth. Fishing is prohibited within 300 feet of the weir. Eshamy Creek and the lake itself, together with its tributaries, hosts cutthroat trout and Dolly Varden. If you plan to fish the lake, you are in for a .3 mile hike up Eshamy Creek. Bring a small inflatable boat to navigate the lake, as thick shoreline vegetation makes navigating the lakeshore difficult. Another sockeye run occurs in the small stream south of Eshamy Creek to the lake. Sockeye may also be found in the small creek on the north side of the bay about 2.2 miles by water from the lodge. The sockeye run starts in mid-July and peaks around the middle of August. Eshamy Creek also gets runs of chum, coho, and pink salmon. Halibut, lingcod, and rockfish can be found on any of several humps and plateaus off the mouth of the bay and around Crafton Island, just to the north. Distance from Whittier: 41 miles.

23. Granite Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish. There’s a lake at the head of Granite Bay that hosts a run of pink salmon. Other species migrate through the area, particularly off the mouth of the bay. Look for halibut and rockfish on the humps and plateaus off the mouth of the bay. You will also find rockfish and lingcod at the entrance to the bay, along the headlands on either side, and around Junction Island to the south. Distance from Whittier: 46.1 miles.

Chenega Island Area

24. Dangerous Passage. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. Try the plateau at the north end of Chenega Island at the entrance to Dangerous Passage for halibut. Similar structures are found as you move south through the passage, most notably at the entrance to Paddy Bay and Ewan Bay. Prospect for rockfish and lingcod along the shoreline areas where the bottom drops off sharply. These are also great places to troll for salmon. There’s a lagoon at the head of Ewan Bay and it hosts runs of chum, pink, and sockeye salmon, but the lagoon is blocked by a narrow chute that becomes a waterfall on the outgoing tide. Steer clear. Chums and pinks also spawn in the creeks on the west side of Ewan Bay. Masked Bay sports runs of pink salmon at the head of the bay. Chums and pinks spawn in the small bay opposite Ewan Bay as well. There are tributary streams flowing into the salt at both ends of this bay.  Distance from Whittier: 47.6 miles.

25. Jackpot Bay. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. Em’urluq Bay has two salmon streams, both of which have spawning pinks. Next door in Seven Fathom Hole you’ll find both pinks and chum salmon. Both of these basis provide good anchorages in rough weather. Jackpot Creek hosts runs of chum, king, pink, coho, and sockeye salmon, as well as Dolly Varden. Jackpot Creek is a sizeable waterway that flows through a chain of lakes to the north and contains several pools where you will find salmon. You’ll find chum salmon and pink salmon in the streams along the west side of the bay, and a run of sockeye toward the end of the arm that flows behind Jackpot Peak. Halibut are found throughout the area, and you can prospect for lings and rockfish around the entrance to the bay, and around Jackpot Island. Distance from Whittier: 55.6 miles.

26. Chenega Island. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, shrimp. Chenega Island offers a variety of salmon spawning streams on both sides of the island, including a small run of sockeye that use a small stream at the back of the bay opposite Delenia Island. King salmon don’t spawn on Chenega, but you can catch them by trolling along the headlands, or along the steep banks on the east side of the island. Use the same tactic for chum, coho, and pink salmon. Halibut are easiest to find on any of several humps and plateaus throughout Dangerous Passage. Another spot worth checking is the mouth of Kake Cove. Fish it on an outgoing tide after the pinks have spawned, to intercept halibut feeding on salmon carcasses.  Lingcod and rockfish are found throughout the area. from Whittier: 50 miles.

27. Whale Bay. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. At the end of the west arm of Whale Bay there is a stream that comes out of a couple of lakes that lie just inland. This stream has all five salmon species, and it may have Dolly Varden. The approach to this stream is very shallow, so trolling out in the bay may be your best option for salmon. Halibut fishing in this area is best on an outgoing tide, as salmon carcasses are washed downriver and into the bay. Two streams flow northeast below Claw Peak, and these have chum and pink salmon runs. The remaining streams in the east arm of Whale Bay all have runs of chums and pinks. The area from the eastern headland at the entrance to the bay, south, and east to Pt. Countess offers opportunities for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. Distance from Whittier: 61 miles.

28. Bainbridge Island. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Bainbridge Island, with its 74 miles of coastline and over fifty offshore islands, offers a wide variety of freshwater and saltwater fishing opportunities. The northwestern peninsula has a number of salmon streams on both sides; all of these host runs of pink salmon. At the southern end of the bay which separates the northeastern and northwestern peninsulas there are five salmon streams. All of them host runs of pink salmon. The eastern-most stream also has a run of chum salmon, and the western-most stream drains out of a lake and has chum, pink, and sockeye salmon. The streams facing Bainbridge Passage all host runs of pink salmon. The four main streams draining into Hogg Bay have (listed from east to west) pink salmon, chum / pink / sockeye salmon, chum / pink salmon, and pink salmon, respectively. The stream draining into the head of Swanson Bay has pink salmon, while all the streams draining to the east, into Prince of Wales Passage host runs of pink salmon only. Halibut, lingcod, and rockfish can be found just about anywhere around the island. There are a couple of small plateaus to prospect for halibut off the north end of the island; one is just southeast of Bainbridge point and the other is southwest of Gage Island. There is a current associated with the tide change through Prince of Wales Passage; consider fishing for halibut at the downstream side of Amerk Point, depending on which way the tide is moving. It’s generally best to fish the deeper water at the downstream end of the relatively shallow water in this area, as that’s where the bait will be. There’s a Stellar sea lion colony at Procession Rocks, and the fishing around this area is good for lingcod and rockfish. Distance from Whittier: 68 miles.

Evans Island Area

29. Sawmill Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Silvers show up in Sawmill Bay in July. The Armin F. Koernig Hatchery (formerly the San Juan Hatchery) is operated by Prince William Sound Aquaculture Association and is located in the southwest corner of Sawmill Bay. The hatchery produces pink salmon and chum salmon for redistribution elsewhere in Prince William Sound. The stream flowing into Crab Bay hosts runs of chums and pinks, while the stream flowing in at Chenega Bay village has pink, coho, and sockeye salmon. Your best bet for lingcod and rockfish is out around Bettles Island. Halibut can be found on the humps and plateaus north of Bettles Island and along the eastern side of Latouche Passage. The streams draining off of Elrington Island all have runs of pink salmon. Distance from Whittier: 74 miles.

Latouche Island Area

30. Latouche Island. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Virtually all streams draining from Latouche Island contain runs of pink salmon. In addition, streams draining into Sleepy Bay, Wilson Bay, and Horseshoe Bay host runs of chum salmon. Trolling for coho salmon is productive around Latouche, particularly around the south end of the island. This is also a great location for halibut, as there is a shelf that runs about five miles south from the mouth of Latouche Passage out into the Gulf of Alaska. Rockfish and lingcod can be found just about anywhere around the island, but a good place to check is the kelp beds around Danger Island and between Danger and Latouche islands. The kelp wraps around the southeast side of Latouche for about two miles. This is also a good place to find greenling. Distance from Whittier: 69 miles.

Montague Island Area

31. Port Chalmers. Species: Chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Port Chalmers is located on the northeast side of Montague Island. There's a commercial chum salmon hatchery in Port Chalmers, and you can expect to find trolling and casting opportunities in the surrounding waters from mid-summer into the fall, as fish make their way to the hatchery. Halibut prospects improve along the steep drop that runs between Stockdale Harbor and Green Island. The edge of the drop-off is around 180-200 feet, and it drops off to about 400 feet. Consider dropping shrimp pots in this hole. Prospect the humps north and west of Port Chalmers for halibut and rockfish. Use NOAA Chart #16701. Distance from Whittier: 70 miles.

Port Chalmers Cabin: This cabin is located on the southern end of Port Chalmers. It sleeps six people, and includes bunks, a table and benches, wood stove, oil stove, and a rain barrel. It also has an outhouse. Bring your own drinking water, as the rain barrel may be empty. Bring stove fuel, and your own cookware, cookstove, stove fuel, bedding, and a means to collect firewood if you want to use the woodstove. CLICK HERE to reserve the cabin. GPS: N60°12'58" W147°17'21" / Lat. 60.21611111 Long. 147.2891667

Green Island Cabin: This 16x20 cabin is located on a peninsula in a shallow bay on the north end of the island. It’s handicap-accessible and sleeps six on provided bunks. The cabin includes a table and benches, a wood stove, an oil stove, a rain barrel, and an outhouse. Bring your own stove fuel for heat, or a means to collect firewood for the woodstove. Bring your own drinking water (in case the rain barrel is empty), cookware, cookstove and fuel, lantern, and bedding. CLICK HERE to reserve this cabin. GPS: N60°17'20" W147°23'44" / Lat. 60.28888889 Long. 147.3955556

Knight Island Area 

32. Snug Harbor. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The stream at the head of the bay hosts runs of pink and chum salmon. After the salmon start dying off, try drifting for halibut on an outgoing tide off the mouth of the stream into deeper water. Look for rockfish and lingcod around Discovery Point and along the headland north of the bay. There is a series of shallow humps off the mouth of the harbor; one is just south of Discovery Point and the others are north and east of the bay. Check these areas for halibut and rockfish. Distance from Whittier: 67 miles.

33. Drier Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Drier Bay, together with Mummy Island, Cathead Bay, Mallard Bay, and Port Audrey, offers a sheltered anchorage, great scenery, and opportunities for a variety of fish. The area is dotted with shallow humps, small rockpiles, and rocky points that provide good opportunities for rockfish and lingcod. The stream at the end of Cathead Bay has a run of chum salmon, as does the last stream in Port Audrey. The rest have runs of pink salmon. Try your luck for halibut on any of the humps at the mouth of the bay, or outside where it drops off to deep water. Distance from Whittier: 52 miles.

34. Bay of Isles. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The Bay of Isles, located on the east side of Knight Island, offers a number of safe anchorages, giving weekenders a variety of choices depending on the weather. Fishing opportunities are varied, but the area is best known for silver salmon. Cutthroat trout and Dolly Varden are found in the creek flowing into the head of West Arm. There are coho, pink, and sockeye salmon here too. The creek flowing out of Otter Lake on the north side of the bay offers coho, pink, and sockeye salmon, along with cutthroat trout and Dolly Varden. The rest of the bay’s streams host runs of pink salmon. The bay itself features a number of humps, shelves, and holes that offer good opportunities for halibut and rockfish. You will also find rockfish and greenling in the kelp beds in the area. Use NOAA Chart #16705. Distance from Whittier: 52 miles.

35. Lower Herring Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, Dolly Varden, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The streams flowing into Lower Herring Bay offer runs of pink salmon, and the northernmost arm offers a run of coho salmon in addition to pinks. The numerous rockpiles around the shoreline, combined with the shallow reefs off the entrance of the bay offer good opportunities for rockfish and lingcod. Concentrate your halibut efforts on the shallow humps off the mouth of the bay, and along the deep drop-off into Knight Island Passage to the west. Distance from Whittier: 48.6 miles. 

36. Herring Bay. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, lingcod, pacific cod, shrimp. Herring bay is protected from long ocean swells that come in from the south, and it offers a protected anchorage in heavy weather. Trolling or mooching are effective techniques for silvers here. The stream that drains the lake in Solf Cove has chum, coho, pink, and sockeye salmon, along with Dolly Varden. Halibut and rockfish can be found along the shoreline rockpiles as well as around the islands at the head of both arms of the bay. Try fishing the deep drops on either side of the entrance of the bay for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. In between Lower Herring Bay and Herring Bay itself you can find halibut, flounder, and pacific cod. Use NOAA Chart #16705. Distance from Whittier: 45 miles.

Naked Island Area

NOTE: The waters around Naked, Peak, and Storey islands offer dozens of humps and plateaus where you can find halibut. Look for humps and plateaus that rise from deep water to 100-300 feet. Use a chum bag and toss chunked herring over the side to get the action headed your way.

37. Bass Harbor. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Trolling is your best option for salmon in this area, as there are no salmon streams here. Troll along the points on either side of the entrance to the harbor. Rockfish and lingcod are found on both sides, and on humps found throughout the area. Fish the humps and plateaus for halibut as well. Distance from Whittier: 48 miles.

38. Outside Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The bay reaches depths of 138 feet and may offer some opportunity for halibut, but your best bet is to fish the humps and plateaus directly off the mouth of the bay, and north toward Cabin Bay. This area also offers good opportunities for rockfish and lingcod. There is one salmon stream in the bay; it’s on the south side behind the peninsula, and it hosts a run of pink salmon. Your best bet for silvers and possibly feeder kings and chum salmon is to troll the points on both sides of the bay. Distance from Whittier: 45 miles.

39. Cabin Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod. Cabin Bay is littered with relatively shallow humps and plateaus that offer great opportunities for halibut fishing. Rockfish and lingcod opportunities exist throughout the bay as well. The best salmon trolling is off the mouth of the bay as the water drops off into the deeper waters of Prince William Sound. Distance from Whittier: 45 miles.

40. McPherson Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod. McPherson passage has a stream that hosts a run of pink salmon, but there are none in McPherson Bay. The bay is relatively sheltered and makes a good anchorage. There are a few humps in the bay that rise up seventy or more feet from the bottom, making them possibilities for halibut or rockfish. Look for rockfish and lingcod along the headland on the east side of McPherson Passage during tide changes. Bait will wash into the eddy formed by the current in this area. Distance from Whittier: 47.5 miles.

Perry Island Area

41. South Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp, oysters. The bay offers opportunities for rockfish and halibut around Meares Point and off the headland on the east side of the bay. There are numerous rockpiles throughout the area for lings and rockfish, and you can prospect for halibut on the plateau off the entrance to the bay. The lake that drains into the head of the bay has several streams that host pink salmon. There’s a small commercial oyster farm in the South Bay, so stop by for a special treat. The proper protocol is to call ahead to make sure someone is there to relieve you of your cash in exchange for some delicious oysters. Distance from Whittier: 31 miles.

42. West Twin Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. West Twin has three salmon streams flowing into the head of the bay, and all three have runs of pink salmon. One the salmon runs are dying off, try fishing halibut where the bottom drops off the middle of the bay, on an outgoing tide. Salmon carcasses will drift out with the tide and halibut will come into the bay to feed on them. Other than that, try the plateau that runs east of Egg Rocks for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. Troll for silvers off the mouth of the bay. Distance from Whittier: 25 miles.

43. East Twin Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. There’s a run of pink salmon that run up the river at the head of the bay, and it’s possible to pick up a halibut in that area once the salmon start to die off. The entire bay is less than 200’ deep, so it’s all fishable for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. Try the area off the mouth of the bay where the bottom contour drops off steeply. This is a good area for halibut and rockfish. You might also try the shallower areas south and west of Fool Island for halibut and rockfish. Troll for silvers in the channel between Point Perry and Fool Island. NOTE: Lone Island is about seven miles west of East Twin Bay and offers good fishing for rockfish and lingcod. The Dutch Group of islands lies about 4.5 miles to the east of East Twin and offers good rockfish and lingcod, plus halibut. Distance from Whittier: 27 miles.

Esther Island Area

44. Eaglek Bay. Species: Pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. Eaglek Bay several good anchorages, and is fairly protected. Silvers move through this area, as do pinks and chums. Halibut and rockfish are found along the edges of the shelf at the mouth of the bay, and shrimping can be productive in this area. Use NOAA Chart #16700. Distance from Whittier: 36 miles.

45. Derickson Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp, tanner crab. All of the streams flowing into Derickson Bay have pink salmon, and the one at the extreme head of the bay also has a run of chums. The bay offers good shrimping. Halibut are available in the area; concentrate your efforts on the humps and plateaus off the mouth of Derickson in Eaglek Bay. Distance from Whittier: 38 miles.

46. Squaw Bay. Species: Pink salmon, chum salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. The streams flowing into the head of Squaw Bay are known spawning areas for chum and pink salmon. Expect to find fish there in July, and through the fall. The entrance to the bay is marked by an underwater plateau at about 160 feet, which drops off quickly to over 400' outside the bay and over 300' just inside the bay. Fish the plateau and the edges where it drops off to deeper water for halibut and rockfish. This is also a popular shrimping area. Fish the drops or the hole just inside the bay. Use NOAA Chart #167055. Distance from Whittier: 30 miles.

47. Esther Passage. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. Esther Passage offers a wide variety of opportunities for most species found in Prince William Sound. Heading up the passage from the south you come to Shoestring Cove on the west side. The head of this cove has three salmon streams, and all three host runs of pink salmon. Farther up the passage on the west side is Fish Pass. It’s a short stream that drains a small lake to the east. This stream hosts runs of chum, coho, pink, and sockeye salmon, plus cutthroat trout and Dolly Varden. Another creek on the opposite side to the east hosts a run of pink salmon. As you approach the narrow portion of the passage, the first creek on the right has pink salmon, and the other four streams just after the eastern headland have pinks and chum salmon. The rest of the streams from there north are on the east side, and they all have chums and pinks. The southern entrance to Esther Passage offers numerous mounds, humps, and plateaus that offer opportunities for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. The northern end of the passage is marked by a bottom contour that drops from 200’ to over 1100’ in a very short distance. Fish the edge of this drop-off for halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. This is also a great place to troll for salmon. Distance from Whittier: 29 miles.

48. Esther Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The streams draining into Esther Bay all have runs of pink salmon, and pinks, chums, and silvers can be caught if you troll the mouth of the bay and around toward Hodgkins point. The entrance of the bay drops off very quickly, creating a seam that offers good fishing for halibut and rockfish. Lingcod and rockfish are available in the bay and among the islands at the mouth of the bay. Distance from Whittier: 25 miles.

49. Lake Bay. Species: Chum salmon, king salmon, halibut, rockfish. The Wally Noerenberg Hatchery is located at the head of Lake Bay, and it handles pink, coho, and chum salmon. You can expect to find all three species of salmon there in early July. Troll the bay and the waters off the mouth for chums and silvers. The rocky headlands on both sides of the bay offer good opportunities for rockfish and lingcod. The entrance of the bay quickly drops off to deep water, offering a good opportunity to fish halibut in the entrance, right at the area where the bottom starts to fall away. South Esther Island State Marine Park is located on the northeast side of Lake Bay, and offers tent platforms and a vault latrine if you prefer shore-based camping in this area. Distance from Whittier: 21.5 miles.

50. Granite Bay. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. The area surrounding Granite Bay is the Granite Bay State Marine Park. It’s a beautiful, sheltered anchorage located just over 20 miles from Whittier. The head of the south arm of Granite Bay has a stream that hosts a run of pink salmon. The bay itself offers opportunities for halibut and rockfish, while the mouth of the bay contains a lot of structure where you can find rockfish and lingcod. Just off the mouth of the bay the water drops from 120 feet to over a thousand feet. Fish the edges of this drop for halibut, or troll for salmon across the mouth of the bay, from north to south. Distance from Whittier: 22 miles.

Port Wells Area

51. College Fiord. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, pacific cod, shrimp. College Fjord was named during the Harriman Expedition in 1899. The story goes that the expedition included a Harvard and an Amherst professor, and they named most of the glaciers in the area after elite eastern colleges, conspicuously omitting Princeton. This is why many of the glaciers here bear college names, and why the fjord itself ends in two arms named “Harvard” and “Yale”. There are several tidewater glaciers here (glaciers that calve off directly into the ocean), so there are always ice chunks to watch as you navigate the area. The upper reaches of College Fjord carry a heavy load of glacial silt and fresh water, so the better fishing is at the south end toward the entrance. There are two significant glacial moraines that bisect the fjord; the upper one is in the vicinity of Mt. Emerson, and the second is at the entrance, beginning at the east side of Point Pakenham. There are several streams in the vicinity of Davis Lake, which contain chum, pink, and sockeye salmon. Four of these streams drain into a little bay, but the bay is shallow and fish may be spooked in there. Better trolling opportunities exist just outside the bay in deeper water. The bottom drops off sharply to the west, and this area is your best bet for halibut and rockfish. You may also try both underwater peninsulas that jut out from the northeast and southwest sides of the fjord; there’s a channel between these where the tide surges in and out of the fjord. There are a couple of salmon streams on the west side in the vicinity of Barnard Glacier. Both of these host runs of pink salmon. Distance from Whittier: 31 miles.

52. Coghill River. Species: Chum salmon, pink salmon, silver salmon, sockeye salmon, cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, halibut, lingcod, rockfish. This is a very popular fishery with fly-in anglers targeting sockeye salmon from the lake down to the weir. The weir is located about 1.7 miles upriver from the saltwater, and fishing is closed for 300 feet both sides of the weir. The best fishing is below the weir because the current picks up a little more, making it possible to get a good drift. The sockeye fishery peaks around July 4th, with the best fishing action occurring between commercial salmon openings. If you fish during the commercial openings, be prepared for a river with very few fish; the commercial seiners are very efficient. The river also hosts runs of chums, pinks, and coho salmon, along with cutthroat trout and Dolly Varden. The best halibut fishing in the area is just off the shelf south of the river, in 60-100 feet of water or deeper. Time your halibut fishing for the early part of July or later, to coincide with the salmon runs. Distance from Whittier: 36 miles.

Coghill Lake Cabin. This is a 16x16 A-frame cabin with a sleeping loft. It is located just below the outlet from the lake, within easy walking distance to Coghill River fishing opportunities. It accommodates up to six people on provided wood bunks and features a kerosene heating stove (bring your own fuel), a table, benches, and an outhouse. Bring your own cookstove and fuel, cookware, lantern, bedding, and water filter/jug. Water from the lake should be filtered. CLICK HERE to reserve this cabin. The cabin is very popular during salmon season, so reserve it well in advance. GPS: N61°4'56" W147°51'40" / Lat. 61.08222222 Long. 147.8611111

53. Harriman Fjord. Species: Halibut, rockfish. There’s a submerged glacial moraine across the entrance of the fjord, that comes up to less than 20 feet in places. Fish the edges of this shelf where it drops off to deep water on the Barry Arm side for halibut and rockfish. Watch for uncharted rocks in this area and proceed with caution. Distance from Whittier: 33 miles.

54. Port Wells. Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp. Look for halibut and rockfish on any of several humps located off the mouth of Pigot Bay, the Esther Rock area, the shoal at the mouth of Barry Arm, and at the entrance to College Fjord. Distance from Whittier: 17 miles.

Harrison Lagoon Cabin. This cabin is on the west side of Port Wells, two miles north of Hobo Bay. There is no deepwater protected anchorage here, so your best bet if you are approaching by boat is to anchor in Hobo Bay and use a tender or skiff to get to the cabin. Harrison Lagoon is too shallow to navigate at low tide. The cabin is handicap-accessible with a step from the boardwalk into the outhouse. It measures 16x20 and sleeps six on the provided bunks. Includes a table and benches, an oil stove (bring your own kerosene) and an outhouse. Bring your own stove fuel, cookware, cookstove and fuel, lantern, bedding, food, and drinking water container and water filter. Drinking water is available at Lagoon Creek, or by walking along the shoreline to the creek at low tide. Filter your water! CLICK HERE to reserve this cabin. GPS: N60°59'4.16" W148°11'52" / Lat. 60.98449 Long. 148.1977778

55. Pigot Bay. Species: Species: King salmon, pink salmon, chum salmon, silver salmon, halibut, rockfish, shrimp, clams. The pink salmon run is from late July to early August. Fish the bay or any of several freshwater streams draining into the bay. Halibut, rockfish, and yelloweye are available in the bay and on the three seamounts off the entrance to the bay. Shrimp are available in the bay, and the head of the bay offers some opportunities for steamer clams and cockles at any of several gravel beaches. Be very careful with clams, as there is no monitoring program to warn you of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP). Several freshwater streams enter the head of the bay, and all of them host runs of salmon. This includes chum, coho and pink salmon. Swanson Creek has Dolly Varden in it as well. Distance from Whittier: 14 miles.

Pigot Bay Cabin: This cabin is located on a bluff overlooking Pigot Bay. Access it via the staircase leading up from the beach at Pigot Bay. The cabin is a 16'x16' A-frame with a loft, sleeps six on provided bunks. Bedding is not provided, so guests should bring bedding. Amenities include bunk beds, propane heater (bring fuel), a table, benches, broom, fire extinguisher. There's an outhouse with a pit toilet. There's also a small gravel pad with a fire ring. Fresh water is not easily available near the cabin, and any water you are able to find by hiking must be treated before use. You're better off to haul your own water to stay in this cabin. Bring the following items for your stay: Drinking water (no water is available close by), sleeping bags and pads, propane for the heater (full 20-lb. bottle should suffice), propane cookstove, cookware and utensils, plates, bowls, dishpan, dish soap, water jug and filter system, lantern, toilet paper, trash bags. Advance reservations recommended AT THIS LINK. GPS: N60°50'34" W148°23'45" / Lat. 60.84277778 Long. 148.3958333

 


Deep Water Release of Rockfish

All rockfish have a "swim bladder" or "float bladder" (as it is sometimes called.) This organ inflates to help the fish maintain neutral buoyancy at any depth. As the fish moves up or down in the water column the bladder adjusts itself incrementally to accommodate changes in pressure. When you catch a rockfish in water deeper than 30 feet, the bladder cannot adjust quickly enough and over-expands. It's common to see rockfish floating on the surface after anglers have released them. This is because the bladder is too large to allow the fish to submerge to depth on its own. Such fish are subject to being picked off by predators such as eagles and other surface predators. Because they cannot descend, they eventually die.The remedy for this is to employ the use of a so-called "deep-water release" device. This is a weighted system that allows you to return the fish to the depth where it was caught, unharmed. In many areas of Alaska, including Prince William Sound, anglers are required to use this device in order to increase the survival rate of released rockfish. CLICK HERE to order a deep-water release device. CLICK HERE to read our section on Rockfish Recompression.

What to Wear


The Whittier Angler's Gear Bag

You'll need to adjust your gear to match the species you're after, but this should give you a good lead on being prepared. Pack your gear in a tackle duffel and bring it along with you on the ferry. You can order most of the items on the list by clicking on the item name.

Boat-Based Fishing Gear

Rigging up for a saltwater trip can get complicated in a hurry, especially when there are several species involved. The best recommendation is to bring separate tackle boxes / satchels for each species. Be sure to bring along a five-gallon bucket and some fresh water, so you can drop your used tackle inside for a rinse, before putting it back with the rest of your gear. Otherwise you risk rusting your expensive hooks and lures.

King and Silver Salmon

Halibut, Rockfish and Lingcod

Herring


Resources

If you plan to fish anywhere on the Kenai Peninsula, you need a copy of Dave Atcheson's "Fishing the Kenai Peninsula" in your rig. If you're new to the area, a copy of The Milepost will help you plan your trip, providing maps and detailed information on the locations of campgrounds, cabins, places to eat, fuel stops, and much more. While you're in the bookstore, you might also check out our maps of  Kachemak Bay State ParkKenai River (includes only the middle and lower sections of the river, from Skilak Lake to the mouth), and the Northwestern Kenai Peninsula map, which includes only the areas around Kenai, Soldotna, Sterling, Kasilof, and Nikiski. These are road maps, but they also show campgrounds, fishing areas and available species. Finally, check out Scott Haugen's excellent book, "Bank Fishing for Steelhead and Salmon" for excellent tips that will work on the Kenai River, Deep Creek, and other places on the Kenai Peninsula.


Click on the following links to review angling opportunities in the various areas of the Kenai Peninsula.

Whittier Saltwater Fishing |  Kenai Peninsula Fishing Intro  |  Upper Kenai Peninsula Fishing  |  Central Kenai Peninsula Fishing  |  Lower Kenai Peninsula Fishing  |  Kenai Peninsula Marine Fishery  |  Kenai Peninsula Clamming  |  Seward Saltwater Fishing  |  Seldovia Fishing

  

Introduction to Fishing the Kenai Peninsula

Freshwater and saltwater road-based fishing opportunities abound across the Kenai Peninsula. All five species of Pacific salmon swim it's rivers, and grayling, lake trout, Dolly Varden, Rainbow trout and northern pike can be found in lakes and rivers throughout the area. The road system allows excellent access to many premium fishing areas, including both freshwater and saltwater opportunities. And don't forget clamming on Kenai Peninsula beaches! For many people, a weekend clamming excursion is just the thing to put a touch of class on an Alaska summer of outdoor fun.

Fishing in Alaska's Russian River

Fishing the Upper Kenai Peninsula

The upper Kenai Peninsula offers varied roadside and hike-in fishing opportunities for all five species of Pacific salmon, together with Dolly Varden, rainbow trout, grayling and more. Though most of the fisheries listed here are along the road system, some involve hiking in to areas that can be reached on a day-trip basis, or on a long weekend. Saltwater opportunities exist in the Seward area, where anglers can fish from shore for a variety of species.

Fishing the Central Kenai Peninsula

The central Kenai Peninsula is a road-based fisherman's mecca. Here you will find the crown jewels of the state's freshwater salmon fishing opportunities; the Russian River and the Kenai River. The Russian boasts two runs of sockeye salmon, an annual run of silver salmon, and a resident population of wild rainbow trout and Dolly Varden. The Kenai itself, whether you're fishing the upper, middle, or lower sections, has something to offer anyone in pursuit of salmon, trout or char. The lower river is renowned for it's outsized king salmon, with boaters jockeying for position in the best runs, hoping to hook the fish of a lifetime. The upper river offers a peaceful drift amid stunning snow-capped pinnacles that are home to bear and Dall sheep, while the river is teeming with sockeye salmon, silver salmon, trophy rainbow trout, and Dolly Varden. This is a fly-fisherman's paradise.

Lower Kenai Peninsula Fishing

The lower Kenai Peninsula offers some great freshwater and shore-based saltwater fishing opportunities without the crowds found elsewhere on the Kenai Peninsula. There is no other roadside fishery in Southcentral Alaska that offers shore-based surf fishing for halibut and king salmon. Many of the rivers here are short, and easily accessed. And finally, the Homer Spit offers some unique opportunities for saltwater king salmon and silver salmon, as well as bottom fish that can be caught from shore (this is a great place for children to catch their first salmon). It's a unique fishery, with diverse opportunities.

Subcategories

 

 

 

 





Alaska Outdoors Supersite

16578 Permanenti Rd.

Sutton, Alaska 99674

1 (907) 229-4501

Email Us

Go to top